Meditation Is Simple

Meditation Is Simple
by Art Ticknor

                     
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1. Notice what you're seeing
2. Everything else takes care of itself

Be a lamp unto yourself

"Be a lamp unto yourself"

The mind-self feels what it wants (i.e., what it lacks) and is constructed to satisfy the want:

  • Food, shelter, etc. (biological)
  • Companionship, etc. (psychological)
  • Absolute/permanent X (love, certainty, life, peace, etc.)

    It watches/looks for what it wants,
    Often getting distracted by what it sees
    But eventually goaded again to find what it's looking for –
    By turning away from attention-getting distractions.

    By "remembering" what you feel as your deep wanting
    & noticing (consciously, effortfully as needed) what you're seeing,
    The mind more productively turns away from the "100 other good ideas that are there."
    [1]

    Set aside some time each day to notice. At the same time every day is best. Doing so the first thing in your day sends a message to the inner self.
    Conserve energy to aide in the process of conscious noticing.
    Watch the mind calibrate the probability of relevance to your deep longing of what it's seeing & watch it turn away from low-probability content.

    At some point the mind's intuition-feeling sense will tell it that what it's looking for is within … where finding is becoming.



    [1] "People think that focus means saying yes to the thing you've got to focus on. But that's not what it means at all. It means saying no to the 100 other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully…. Life is brief, and then you die, you know?" Steve Jobs, Apple CEO, in a 3/17/08 Fortune magazine interview


    See also Meditation: What Is It?
    by the website author and
    An Experiment in Common-Sense Meditation

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